Fly Fishing the Sierras- East and West Carson Rivers

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The good news is here up high in the mountains.  Summer is on her way out and fall is quickly on her way in.  If watching those beautiful aspens shed their fiery leaves while kicking drifts down soft seams is your thing, well now is the time!  We had our first frost of the morning yesterday with temps kicking back up into the mid to high 70s in the afternoon….perfect weather!  The water temps have also dropped drastically in our area with these cool nights and mild day time temperatures.  The fish are eager and willing as long as your able to come spend the time in to trick these feisty trout.  We have the October caddis hatch popping off any time now.  And soon after that comes the snow….well so we hope.  Fingers crossed.  So if you would like to get out one last time before that white stuff hits the ground feel free to drop on in the shop or shoot us a ring.  We at Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters would love to show you guys and gals around in our backyard.

West Walker River Guided Fly Fishing

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West Walker River, Mono County still stocking the big hogs… come fight some 5 pound plus hogs with us… enjoy Fall in the beautiful Sierra Nevada Mountains. The West Walker is the best freestone river we have going around right now… get out there before the snow (hopefully) starts falling…

Wet wading is coming to an end. Tahoe/Truckee river/Sierras

Fall is nipping our heels…our shall I say brushing our legs.  With the morning temperatures quickly plummeting how much longer can we enjoy the leisure of fishing in our shorts?  A week?  Two weeks?  Nobody knows except good ol mother nature.  Today it was quite nippy in the Tahoe region.  The river was quite brisk this afternoon as we crossed throughout the day.  Id say we are safe as far as dangerous water temps for our fishy friends.  It’s go time!  And if you want to get out a few more times before we need to pull our waders out of the closet, now is it!  Come join us for a day on the water while summer tries to cling on and fall begins to barge in.

Fly Fishing Guide School 2016!

Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters is proud and excited to announce that our 6th annual Fly Fishing Guide School dates have been set.  We will be conducting next year’s school Monday thru Saturday 5/9/16 to 5/14/15. After you complete school, you can add on two “shadow days” with any of our guides for an 8 day experience.  Fulfill your dreams and join us for the most comprehensive fly fishing guide school in the industry.  Feel free to contact me with any questions you might have and follow us for more information and details.

We are very proud to be a Simms endorsed Guide School

Rick McGuire, Guide School Director 530-318-5694  rickemcguire@yahoo.com

It is not all doom and gloom!

Yes it is true that our beloved Truckee is not faring well with the ongoing drought. It seems like all you see scrolling on the internet is how bad things are. Well there is still some great summertime fishing out there, from high lakes and spring creeks to carp fishing down low. I have spent my last few days all over the area from the West Walker to Sawmill Lake on the north shore of Tahoe. If you know where to look and when to go, the fishing has been good to great. So grab that 3 wt and go for a hike, break out the poppers and chase some bass, or check out some other great rivers and lakes in the Sierra. With the busy days of summer its a great time to check out some private water like Sawmill Lake. Call the shop for inquiries!image Here is Kimmy with a fine specimen of a Sawmill Lake rainbow, not a bad first fish ever! Good job Kimmy!

Scouting for Trout: Exploring Tahoe’s High Lakes

In anticipation of moving from Colorado into a full summer working at the Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters, it made sense to shelf my dog-eared John Gierach books in favor of a new local fly fishing demigod: Ralph Cutter. Before arriving, I’d worked my way through a good chunk of Cutter’s book Fish Food , which revolutionized my appreciation for understanding bugs. I was amazed, as a relatively new fly fisherman, how someone could take something as potentially dry as an in-depth look into entomology, and create a page-turner of a guide that actually made me laugh out loud. His work has taken the intimidation out of stopping by the fly shop to pick through the hundreds of tiny bins of flies, and has certainly made me more confident in sharing my excitement for the “fly” part of fly fishing with our customers.

As an avid backpacker and someone with an acute interest in exploring my new high altitude backyard through the lens of fly fishing, Cutter’s chapter on Upslope Blow-In grabbed my attention. It’s a short passage about struggling to find – and nearly giving up on the search for – a storied lake full of chunky goldens who feed on unexpected fare. His small midge emergers are refused repeatedly until he stops, skims the surface, and is stunned to retrieve a handful of PMDs, carpenter ants, beetles, grasshoppers and caddisflies; all of which are lower altitude insects that get blown in from miles away.

This lake, in his words, “did not want to be found”, which provided a suitable challenge for my last two days off. I paired down my usual busting-at-the-seams fanny pack of fly boxes (a hard move for any well-accessorized fisherman who is ever fearful of not having “that one bug”), grabbed my 6 piece backpacking rod, and drove up to the trailhead for an overnight trip I’d hope could produce some trout. Simply the hike in provided good learning: check the forecast ahead of time for gale-force wind conditions (usually not detrimental when just going hiking), and when approaching a rain-swollen lake that you plan on sleeping next to remember your bug spray. (Oh yeah, it’s June.)

Arriving at the first lake was a good sign, although after quickly taking a look over the map and taking a bearing to our destination lake, we realized this probably was not the lake that “didn’t want to be found”, although it shared the same name. It was too easy to get to, contrary to Cutter’s description. After another quarter mile of navigating around beautiful granite outcroppings and scaling a rock slide, we peered down to see a well-protected tarn that looked ultra-fishy. Suddenly I didn’t care what the lake was called or who’d been there before and written about it; it was gorgeous and I felt certain there were fish in it.

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“I’ll set up the tarp if you want to go do your Trout Whisperer thing,” allowed my boyfriend, which made me laugh but also reminded me that I wasn’t on a roiling stream: I did need to approach the very clear, still water with slow, cautious movements. I recalled one of our guides during the shop’s Guide School demonstrating the way to creep up on any clear body of water, so not to spook all the fish. It also dawned on me again that it’s not as obvious where a fish will be in a lake, compared to the streams I’d been learning from lately. You really do need to scout for your trout in these lakes, particularly if they’re not rising up to say “Hey! Here I am!” I proceeded to creep around with my pocket full of new bugs, looking for any sign of which ones to use.

The fishing turned out to be incredibly fun. I found a drop off near a gurgling inlet just tucked out of the consistent wind, put on a size 14 Cutter’s Ant I’d picked up at our shop. I let out some line with a small false roll cast to set up and while reaching up to send line with a real roll cast I missed an unexpectedly explosive strike. This was a real tone setter, it’s on! Every other cast from then on produced beautiful, fat, foot-long dancing brookies that clearly spend their days watching the surface for those blown-in bugs. This was the type of fishing that gets one less worried about size, and more excited to quickly get that bug back out on the water for the next strike. I found myself changing flies just for fun, to see how many different species I’d brought with me that they’d hungrily hit.

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One of the many hungry brookies caught on a blown-in bug pattern.

Although Cutter’s hard-to-get-to-mystery-golden-lake-of-the-same-name still stands elusive, I was pleased to head back towards the car the next day after two solidly educational and rewarding fishing sessions, a refreshing night up in the high country, a reminder of how just beautiful those brook trout are and why I’m inspired to get out there and seek contemplative wilderness experiences, now with my fly rod. Gierach captured it completely when he wrote, “Trout are among those creatures that are one hell of a lot prettier than they need to be. They can get you to wondering about the hidden workings of reality.”

Guide School testamonial

Here is a testimonial from one of our graduates Morgan Kane.  He was also the winner of that year’s casting contest.

Rick,

The school was very informational.  I had a great time learning with the other students as well as the guides and teachers.  I really liked the time everyone really spent with the verbage of teaching.  Now the only way to keep this knowledge fresh is to continue fishing and teaching others that is why I am moving forward with it.  I have already bought my bond through the state and Im in the process of filling out my guides paperwork.  I’m also gonna start shadowing now that I am back from Belize.  This school was so informational one of the nights I was in Belize( nothing but fish on the brain….even tho it was my honeymoon), I had a dream that I was guiding a client on the Truckee river.  “Lob, lift and now lead the indicator down the seam”.  I had a blast and will continue striving forward to turn my passion into a career.

The networking side of things really helps as well.  Throughout the week I would post a new pic each day from our school.  I must have had over a half dozen replys or private messages about the Tahoe Fly fishing guides school.  I ranted nothing but positive replies because I feel the school has helped tremendously.

Thanks again,
Morgan

Sign up today as spots are limited.

Rick McGuire TFFO Guide School Director 530-318-5694  rickemcguire@yahoo.com

Guide School 2015

Once again this year’s Guide School has the privilege of having Jaime Lyle as our casting instructor.  Jaime is a certified FFF Master Casting Instructor and one of the best in the industry.  He is currently a California sales rep for Sage, Redington, and Rio. Student will spend an entire day with Jaime and our instructors working on their personal casting skills and learning how to teach others. We are two months away from this year’s school and getting pretty excited as it approaches.  Contact me if you have any questions and sign up soon as we have a limit on the number of spots available.

Rick McGuire- Guide School Director  530-318-5694  rickemcguire@yahoo.com

LTCC fly fishing class

This spring I will be teaching an 8 hour Introduction to Fly Fishing class through the Community Education Department at Lake Tahoe Community College on Sunday May 10th from 8 am to 5 pm.  This intensive course is designed for the beginner as well as anyone who is struggling with their fly fishing skills.  Topics that are covered include equipment selection, casting, reading water effectively, entomology and fly selection, presenting the fly properly, as well as others.  Check out the college website or contact me for more information.  The course is titled Fly Fishing For Everyone.  Hope to see you there.

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Rick McGuire Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters, rickemcguire@yahoo.com, 530-318-5694